LGBTQ+ Equality in the Workplace

LGBTQ rights are now further protected in the workplace

June 15, 2020 was a monumental day for America. In a landmark case for LGBTQ+ equality, the Supreme Court ruled that federal law prohibits job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or transgender status. This decision is significant and important, as nearly every LGBTQ+ adult has or needs a job. Statistically, the LGBTQ+ community has been one of the most discriminated against demographics in the American workforce. 21% of LGBTQ+ employees report they have been discriminated against in hiring, promotions, and pay. One out of every 25 complaints based on work discrimination comes from an LBGTQ+ employee. The new Supreme Court decision provides hope that the American workforce will be steered in the right direction towards unity and acceptance.

Advocating and fighting against injustices LGBTQ+ workers face does not stop here. According to research done by the Trades Union Congress, about seven in 10 LGBTQ+ people have been sexually harassed at work. Two-thirds said that they did not tell their employer about the sexual harassment, and a  quarter said it was because they were afraid of being “outed” at work.

Reporting Workplace Harassment and Seeking Representation

LGBTQ+ people face higher rates of poverty, marginalization, and stigma. While this places them at a higher risk for being victims of sexual assaults and sexual violence, it may also lead them to believe that because of their identity, they should not report the incident. It is important for those in the LGBTQ+ community to know that reporting any incident, whether it is work discrimination, or sexual harassment or assault in the workplace, their story matters and needs to be reported.  In recent years, more workers across the gender and sexuality spectrum have come forward to share their stories about sexual harassment in the workplace. As the LGBTQ+ community continues to fight for equality in the workplace, Mase Mebane will fight to represent anyone who experiences the unfortunate circumstance of sexual harassment, violence, or assault.

Federal Law Regarding LGBTQ+ Workplace Discrimination

The United States Supreme Court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 makes it unlawful for an employer to discriminate against a person’s sex. The court expanded the definition of sex to include a person’s sexual orientation and transgender status, thus offering protection under Title VII. In the landmark decision, the court stated that “Because discrimination on the basis of homosexuality or transgender status requires an employer to intentionally treat individual employees differently because of their sex, an employer who intentionally penalizes an employee for being homosexual or transgender also violates Title VII.”

Workplace harassment and discrimination based on a person’s sexual orientation or transgender status are inexcusable and illegal. If you are a member of the LGBTQ+ community and have experienced discrimination or harassment, you might be entitled to compensation. Our experienced lawyers at Mase Mebane can help you pursue the justice you deserve.

Types of Workplace Discrimination Experienced by the South Florida LGBTQ+ Community

Unfortunately, workplace discrimination against the LGBTQ+ community in Miami remains a problem. As noted by the Movement Advancement Project, some of the most egregious forms of discrimination include:

  • Wrongful termination
  • Not being hired because of LGBTQ+
  • Lower wages
  • Not being promoted
  • Lack of paid family leave

A person should not have to live in fear of harassment or discrimination because of their LGBTQ+ status. Too many people report not disclosing their sexual orientation or gender identity because of anxiety over how they will be treated in the workplace. The attorneys at Mase Mebane believe in equal protection for all and are here to hold employers accountable for their misconduct.

Our attorneys have experience representing clients in these matters and our firm is a supporter of the LGBTQ+ community. You are not alone in your fight for justice.